PAKWACH. Head teachers in government aided learning institutions in Pakwach district want government intervention in curbing the rampant grabbing of land belonging to the institutions by the locals.

The situation has however been made worse by the lack of land tittles and registration certificates by the schools while others are not fenced.

The head teachers echoed their concerns on Monday while identifying key delivery gaps during joint district and community Service Organization (CSO) monitoring of secondary and primary schools.

Mr Wilfred Onenarach Ojok, the chairperson head teachers’ association Pakwach sub county said six primary schools both community and church founded are rapidly being encroached on by locals grazing animals in them.

He said at Povona and Paroketho primary schools, about 5 acres of land has been grabbed by the neighbouring community who claim that they are unaware of its giveaway by their ancestors to establish the schools more than a century ago.

"This is a wakeup call to us all the stakeholders, almost all the schools in Pakwach Sub county are in sharp land dispute with either the children of those who freely gave land to government schools or the churches that want to expand their projects. This has led to theft, trespass, vandalism and we want mandatory acquisition of land titles to be adopted by all schools”, he said.

He revealed that facilitation by Uganda wildlife Authority (UWA) through community revenue sharing has been earmarked to speed the process of mapping, surveying and subsequently acquiring land title but was quick to note that the fund is too meagre and needs government intervention.

Mr John Okot, the head teacher of Owiny primary school in Pokwero sub county said unfulfilled promises by central government in 2013 to fence the school where the solar eclipse was viewed from has also angered the locals.

Owiny primaryPupils on a compound at Owiny primary school, their school is under threat from local communities.

He called for capacity building of village land committees alongside the school Management Committees to ably re-establish the original boundaries of school land donated by cultural leaders.

Presenting the district's commitment, Mr Ronald Rupiny, the Pakwach district inspector of school said plans are underway to document all the school land size and urged the communities to respect the decisions of cultural leaders in shaping education through offering land.

However, Mr Robert Kule, the project officer governance and social accountability at Action Aid Nebbi cluster urged the district stakeholders to include in their education budget money for registration of institutional lands while they continue to lobby from other Non-governmental organisations.